Week 8: Ethnicity & Federalism

Ethnicity a key factor

We could use some preventative measures here and demand ethical ethnic background checks on all politicians.

Ethnicity, in short, refers to distinctive characteristic trait(s) that can be cultural, religious, regional, linguistic, racial or otherwise based on common origin.

It goes without saying that we all have an ethnic background of sorts stemming from our heritage, but we can also choose beliefs and practices to further refine our individuality. We can then join other like-natured folks and form groups as a way of supporting each other and strengthening our collective ethnic voice. It is to whatever degree one is attached to their ethnicity that determines how passionate they will be in pursuing recognition for their creed and how many will occupy the circle.

Large scale ethnic diversity

In the multi-cultural country of Canada there is much in the way of innate ethnic diversity of every distinction and to accommodate all those voices would appear to be a tough job for a government. The way they are meant to handle it is by determining the most significant ethnic groups and creating departments within the structure of government so they can be represented. At least that’s how it’s supposed to be. The problem is that loopholes in the system allowed a bigger ethnic group with a more thunderous and demanding voice to outstrip all the others – the egocentric corporate elite.

This covetous cluster has not only segregated themselves above everyone else, they have centralized their power in government to the point of closing the doors to all the other groups and settling in to represent their views alone. And, the only time you see them interact with other ethnic factions is when they overact in an effort to elicit votes at election time. One only hears of that kind of narcissistic manifestation existing in third world countries, but it’s happening right in the face of each and every Canadian today.

Unethical ethnicity

Everything we are now seeing and experiencing in Canadian politics is the exact opposite of what we should be seeing and experiencing. What we have is a warped federalism in the total domination by one large group and the lack of advocacy in representing the people, which makes for zero-sum politics – a lose/lose situation.

What we should have is a spirit of coalition and power-sharing that permeates our policies to represent the most intrinsic humanitarian value of equality to create a positive-sum dynamic – a win/win situation.

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